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Obama commissions 16 Army cadets

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Staff Report
TEMPE, Ariz. — President Barack Obama commissioned 16 Army and 24 Air Force Cadets from five Arizona universities during the May 13 commencement ceremonies at Arizona State University. The Cadets took their oath in front of an estimated gathering of 71,000 people, which included more than 9,000 graduates with their families and friends. Also in attendance were members of the Arizona Board of Regents, including Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer.
It was the first time this commander in chief administered the oath and first salute at a commissioning ceremony, and one of the few times in history that a sitting president has done so. Prior to the 2007 National Defense Authorization Act, federal law required a commissioned military officer to administer the oath. The 2007 law opened the door for the president, vice president and secretary of defense to administer the commissioning oath. President Obama also signed the Cadetsí DA-71s himself.
Of those Cadets being commissioned, 29 were from ASU, four from Grand Canyon University, three from Northern Arizona University, two from the University of Arizona and two from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.
The young men and women grew up all over the world from Tempe, Ariz., to Seoul, Korea. They majored in justice studies, communication, history, political science, public safety and nursing.
Matthew Brown, an Army ROTC cadet who earned his bachelorís degree in justice studies, was excited about Obama coming to commencement.
ìItís a pretty big honor and it doesnít happen to a lot of people,î says Brown, who was born in Korea when his father, now retired from the Army, was stationed there.
Brown didnít immediately apply to the officersí training program when he enrolled at ASU. However, someone suggested he give it a try and now that heís completed the program, he likes the idea that when he graduates he will have accomplished more than just a college degree. He will enter active duty in Military Intelligence and be assigned to Ft. Riley, Kansas.
The best part of the ROTC program, according to Brown, was the friends he made along the way. ìWe had to go through really hard things together,î he said.
The worst part? ìGetting up at 5 a.m.î
Michelle Dehorney, a native of Yuma, Ariz., who earned her degree in public safety, agreed that lifelong friendships are a benefit of being in ROTC. She was also thrilled to be sworn in by the nationís commander in chief.
ìHis speech really motivated me,î she said. ìI felt inspired by the idea that even though Iíve accomplished a lot, my ìbody of workî is not done.î Dehorney is excited to begin her career in the Adjutant General field. The idea of adding to oneís ìbody of workî was a central theme in Obamaís commencement address.
The commander of the Army ROTC unit at Arizona State University, Lt. Col. Kirk McIntosh, said heís proud of his Cadets.
ìIn a very uncertain and somewhat chaotic world, ROTC develops the types of leaders that America and the world needs,î McIntosh said. ìIt is absolutely the best leadership program in the world.î
ìWhile in college and attending ROTC classes, we teach our future lieutenants to think critically, to be physically and mentally fit and agile, to take care of others, to live by the Army values, and to lead others in the toughest of circumstances,î said McIntosh, who will retire later this year.
The Department of Military Science at ASU was founded in 1935 and is located within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This year there are 154 Cadets who are members of the Sun Devil Battalion.
The day after the commissioning, on May 14, Cadets from each of the ROTC units participated in pinning ceremonies with their families.
Below are the names and universities of the Army Cadets who were commissioned by President Obama on May 13:
Jordan Breau, ASU
Matthew Brown, ASU
Teri Cunningham, ASU
Andrew Headid, ASU
Dean Hill, ASU
Young Lee, ASU
Archangel Muscato, ASU
Annie Bernholtz, GCU
Michelle Dehorney, GCU
Aaron Shramek, GCU
Carlton Griffin, NAU
Kelly Alford, NAU
Holly Vance, Embry-Riddle
Brian Swift, Embry-Riddle
Yousef, Balooshi, UA
Enewi Liber, UA
Obama commissions 16 Army Cadets at ASU

President Barack Obama commissions ROTC Cadets May 13 at Arizona State University during the Spring commencement. Photo courtesy of Arizona State University

Staff Report

TEMPE, Ariz. — President Barack Obama commissioned 16 Army and 24 Air Force Cadets from five Arizona universities during the May 13 commencement ceremonies at Arizona State University. The Cadets took their oath in front of an estimated gathering of 71,000 people, which included more than 9,000 graduates with their families and friends. Also in attendance were members of the Arizona Board of Regents, including Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer.

It was the first time this commander in chief administered the oath and first salute at a commissioning ceremony, and one of the few times in history that a sitting president has done so. Prior to the 2007 National Defense Authorization Act, federal law required a commissioned military officer to administer the oath. The 2007 law opened the door for the president, vice president and secretary of defense to administer the commissioning oath. President Obama also signed the Cadets’ DA-71s himself.

Of those Cadets being commissioned, 29 were from ASU, four from Grand Canyon University, three from Northern Arizona University, two from the University of Arizona and two from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

The young men and women grew up all over the world from Tempe, Ariz., to Seoul, Korea. They majored in justice studies, communication, history, political science, public safety and nursing.

Matthew Brown, an Army ROTC cadet who earned his bachelor’s degree in justice studies, was excited about Obama coming to commencement.

“It’s a pretty big honor and it doesnít happen to a lot of people,” says Brown, who was born in Korea when his father, now retired from the Army, was stationed there.

Brown didn’t immediately apply to the officers’ training program when he enrolled at ASU. However, someone suggested he give it a try and now that he’s completed the program, he likes the idea that when he graduates he will have accomplished more than just a college degree. He will enter active duty in Military Intelligence and be assigned to Ft. Riley, Kansas.

The best part of the ROTC program, according to Brown, was the friends he made along the way. “We had to go through really hard things together,” he said.

The worst part? “Getting up at 5 a.m.”

Michelle Dehorney, a native of Yuma, Ariz., who earned her degree in public safety, agreed that lifelong friendships are a benefit of being in ROTC. She was also thrilled to be sworn in by the nation’s commander in chief.

“His speech really motivated me,” she said. “I felt inspired by the idea that even though I’ve accomplished a lot, my ‘body of work’ is not done.” Dehorney is excited to begin her career in the Adjutant General field. The idea of adding to one’s “body of work” was a central theme in Obama’s commencement address.

The commander of the Army ROTC unit at Arizona State University, Lt. Col. Kirk McIntosh, said he’s proud of his Cadets.

“In a very uncertain and somewhat chaotic world, ROTC develops the types of leaders that America and the world needs,” McIntosh said. “It is absolutely the best leadership program in the world.”

“While in college and attending ROTC classes, we teach our future lieutenants to think critically, to be physically and mentally fit and agile, to take care of others, to live by the Army values, and to lead others in the toughest of circumstances,” said McIntosh, who will retire later this year.

The Department of Military Science at ASU was founded in 1935 and is located within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. This year there are 154 Cadets who are members of the Sun Devil Battalion.

The day after the commissioning, on May 14, Cadets from each of the ROTC units participated in pinning ceremonies with their families.

Below are the names and universities of the Army Cadets who were commissioned by President Obama on May 13:

  • Jordan Breau, ASU
  • Matthew Brown, ASU
  • Teri Cunningham, ASU
  • Andrew Headid, ASU
  • Dean Hill, ASU
  • Young Lee, ASU
  • Archangel Muscato, ASU
  • Annie Bernholtz, GCU
  • Michelle Dehorney, GCU
  • Aaron Shramek, GCU
  • Carlton Griffin, NAU
  • Kelly Alford, NAU
  • Holly Vance, Embry-Riddle
  • Brian Swift, Embry-Riddle
  • Yousef, Balooshi, UA
  • Enewi Liber, UA
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Written by CadetCommandPAO

May 18, 2009 at 8:36 pm

Posted in News

Tagged with ,

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